4

Global comparison – is Sweden too expensive?

I was a bit disappointed when I realised a ticket to the latest Hobbit movie cost near 25 USD in Sweden. Apparently it is a blockbuster and together with fancy 3D glasses there are no reasons not to milk out as much as possible. A “normal” movie on a rainy Monday morning is only around 18 USD. I had to go to Numbeo and compare a few worldwide cinema ticket prices to find out that tickets in Stockholm (Sweden) are among the highest in the world, being beaten by just a few other cities.

0

India in motion – video blog

I once tried to turn more life into my Indian stories and pictures through an attempt to record a video blog. Unfortunately (or fortunately) I put the project on ice for around two years now finally having a public release. The core of the movie is me feeling lost somewhere in an IT park outside Bangalore charing some experiences around what I do at work, how I like my new city, and India in general. Well, that was the message of the original recording which I have now edited pretty heavily to make it less undiplomatic and more captivating.

3

The review of India

Finally the day has come for me to pack my bags and leave India who hosted me for a nearly one year time and engraved tons of amazing and frustrating memories to my life’s timeline. My experience in India is completely subjective and the perception of this country which refers to this review is only from my, but only my, perspective and my opinions. If I am wrong or someone else thinks different it is not applicable. Don’t be scared by the harsh opening, I will do my best to be nice and honest.

2

2012 in review and still in India

2012 was a truly bad, yet interesting, year which I do not really know how to rate. A year that was almost mentally devastating plagued my persona for too long until 2013 came for rescue, or as an excuse for change.The summary of the amazing year of 2011 indicated that 2012 would be a challenge. Main reason was to find a job that I liked which turned out to be incredible difficult. My goal set for 2012 was to work abroad within Diversity Management and it took me four eternal months to get it, in India of all places. Thanks for my habit of being obsessively persistent when my aim is locked I could finally leave Sweden for my next adventure.

2

Working in India – Promoted and relocated

There has been a lot of sarcasm and complaining written inside the Indian entries of the blog. What has not been mentioned much is my job and it deserves an update when I just finished my first six months and will be shifting role HR role plus relocating to another Indian IT city – that is Bangalore in the south of India and 1 hours flight from Hyderabad. 

0

Cultural awareness or just common sense?

Realized since some time back that I feel slightly less frustrated and stressed about living in India. Should be something positive and I should award myself from passing Level 1 of Indian adaption. Many parameters might be involved but I think I at least have learnt, or forced, myself to accept many of the ‘differences’ in the societal culture.

3

Indian culture shock – worst haircut ever

Life might not be perfect all the time with ups and downs and screaming won’t make the ride more joyful when ones attempts to turn the show around drags down by confused thoughts without clear direction. Knowing which door to open or right path to follow is might be easier if there a pleasant flow of cash, good connections,  and people you are close to. But what really matters is to have a good haircut. Walking down the street while rickshaws are passing by with big eyes starring at you is the ultimate dopamine.

2

From complaining towards entertaining – moving abroad and Japan nostalgia

Two years back I found myself fighting with chopsticks, blaming bureaucracy, and crying at food menu’s with lack of protein. I had arrived and settled down in a small seaside town in south of Japan called Beppu that is well-known for being the most famous hot spring resort in the country and for an university which boasts the most diverse student bodies in all of Asia. I slowly increased my ability to pick up pieces of rice with the wooden sticks, not trying to freak up by all authority obsessed guards, and imported 20 kilos of protein powder to subsidize for the rice.

0

Don´t say No in India just give salad and camera

Don’t imagine things will be the same as back home when in India. In West people like to say No, in India it leans towards the other way around. When asking people for anything, such as

It has been more then 15 days now, where is my salad? I need salad to buy money and rent my pay, this is slightly serious for me!”